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Tool To Create Bootable Windows USB Stick From Linux `WinUSB` (Fork) Renamed To `WoeUSB`, Sees New Release


The WinUSB fork we covered a while back was renamed to WoeUSB recently, while also seeing quite a few releases for the past few days.

WoeUSB

WoeUSB / WinUSB is a tool that can be used to create a bootable Windows installer USB stick from an ISO or DVD. The application supports Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, as well Windows 10, and can be used either with a GUI or from the command line.

As for supported bootmodes, WoeUSB / WinUSB can create a bootable Windows USB installation stick using the following:
  • Legacy / MBR-style / IBM PC compatible bootmode;
  • Native UEFI booting is supported for Windows 7 and later images (with a limitation: only FAT filesystem can be used as the target filesystem).

Since it was forked from Colin Gille’s WinUSB, the application has seen a major code refactoring, bug fixes as well as some minor new features. The changes include:
  • support for both wxWidgets 2 and 3;
  • use pkexec instead of gksudo for privilege escalation;
  • UEFI boot support;
  • numerous bug fixes.

Some newer WoeUSB changes include:

  • support customizing the –label of the newly created filesystem in –format mode;
  • implement checking on target filesystem in –install mode;
  • command line: check if target media is busy before continuing and bail out when the target partition is mounted;
  • support Linux distributions that uses “grub2” as prefix name, such as Fedora;
  • –install and –format installation options are deprecated in favor of –partition and –device, to be more clear what both options will do. The old options will still be available until WoeUSB v3.0;
  • from now on, GRUB will pause when the ENTER key is used before starting to load Windows. This is useful if you want to see if there are errors in the GRUB loading stage.

Also, since the application name has changed, the executables have changed as well: “woeusbgui” for the GUI and “woeusb” for the command line tool.

You can see what’s new in each new WoeUSB release (there were 13 new releases for the past 2 days) on GitHub.

Despite the major code refactoring and numerous bug fixes, I still encountered an error using the WoeUSB GUI, which I also found in the original WinUSB. When the Windows USB stick is completed, WoeUSB displayed the following message: “Installation failed ! Exit code: 256”. This bug was closed on GitHub and it looks like it doesn’t affect the actual Windows USB stick in any way.

In my test, I was able to install Windows 10 64bit in VirtualBox (on an Ubuntu 17.04 host) despite this error.

Install WoeUSB in Ubuntu or Linux Mint via PPA

WoeUSB is available in the main WebUpd8 PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x. To add the PPA and install WoeUSB, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can grab the latest WoeUSB deb from HERE (you’ll only need the “woeusb” deb; the “winusb” deb is there as a transitional dummy package, so those that had the old fork installed will receive the new WoeUSB package as an update).

For how to build WoeUSB from source, report bugs, etc., see its GitHub page.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/webupd8/~3/bvQ4oj8tKkw/tool-to-create-bootable-windows-usb.html

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How To Install XAMPP on Ubuntu 64 Bit


This short tutorial explains how to install XAMPP for GNU/Linux on Ubuntu. This includes download link, how to verify the running servers, and some command lines. This doesn’t include installing web-based software such as WordPress. This tutorial is for beginner users especially those switching from Windows. Any other distro such as Mint, BlankOn, or Deepin, can follow this tutorial as well because the steps are identical. Happy learning!

Subscribe to UbuntuBuzz Telegram Channel to get article updates directly.

Requirement

XAMPP for GNU/Linux is available only for 64 bit computers. You cannot install it on a 32 bit computer.

Download XAMPP

Download the XAMPP package (binary, with .run file extension) from its official page https://www.apachefriends.org/download.html. The file size is around 130MB for the version 5.6.30.

1. Run XAMPP Installer

Put the xampp*.run file on your $HOME directory and invoke these commands:

$ chmod +x xampp-file-name-here.run

$ sudo /xampp-file-name-here.run

and it should run the XAMPP Bitnami Installer. Do the installation and the XAMPP will be installed at /opt/lampp.

2. Run The Manager

To run the GUI XAMPP manager, invoke these command lines

$ sudo -s

# /opt/lampp/manager-linux-x64.run

Then you see a window of XAMPP manager below. Then do

activate Apache
activate MySQL

3. Visit Localhost

After activating the web server (Apache), now you can type http://localhost on your browser and you should see the welcome page of XAMPP. If so, it works.

Dislike GUI Manager?

If you want the fastest way of activating XAMPP, use console commands instead of GUI manager.

Start Apache web server:

$ sudo /opt/lampp/lampp startapache

Start MySQL database server:

$ sudo /opt/lampp/lampp startmysql

Stop them:

$ sudo /opt/lampp/lampp stopapache
$ sudo /opt/lampp/lampp stopmysql

See more info:

$ /opt/lampp/lampp help

Verifying


You can verify whether the Apache & MySQL are actually running or not by these commands:


$ ps aux | grep mysqld
$ ps aux | grep httpd

and you should notice the path of them is /opt/lampp/bin, the user of httpd is daemon and the user of mysqld is mysql.

Now, What?

Now as your XAMPP works, you can install some web-based software such as WordPress or OwnCloud on it, or you can start developing your own PHP or Perl programs on it. Happy learning!



Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Ubuntubuzz/~3/qvWJ6-qhGrw/how-to-install-xampp-on-ubuntu-64-bit.html

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How To Know The Version Of Application Before Installing In Ubuntu


Brief: This quick tip shows you how could you know the version of a program that you are thinking of installing in Ubuntu Linux.

The other day, I was thinking of installing Flowblade, one of the best video editors for Linux. I had two choices for installing this software, either I install it from Ubuntu repositories or from the website of Flowblade itself.

You might already know that the default repository by Ubuntu often doesn’t have the latest versions of a program. Ubuntu does it deliberately to make sure that new version doesn’t have a negative impact on the stability of your system.

But what if you really want only the latest version of an application? You can get it from the official source provided by the provider.

Then comes the question how would you know which version is available to install from Ubuntu?

And this is what I am going to show you in this quick tip. Though I am using Ubuntu here, the same steps are applicable for most other Linux distributions such as Linux Mint, elementary OS etc.

Find out version of a program before installing in Ubuntu

If you read the article about installing software in Ubuntu, you know that you can either use the graphical tool Ubuntu Software Center or the command line itself. We’ll see both ways here.

1. Find out the version of a program before installing in Ubuntu Software Center

Go to Ubuntu Software Center and search for the program you wish to install it. Click on it to find more details about it. You’ll see the information about the version of the program here.

Know the version of a program before installing in Ubuntu Software Center

You’ll also find information about the size of install among other things.

2. Know the version of a program before installing in command line

Like me, if you prefer using the terminal, you can use the command below:

apt show

Know the version of a program before installing in terminal

You can also use the old style apt-cache in either of the below two fashion:

apt-cache policy

apt-cache show

Know the version of a program before installing in terminal

Once you find out the software version which you will be getting from the official Ubuntu sources, you can go on to decide if you should be installing it from Ubuntu or from the developer itself.

I hope this quick tip helped you and you learn a new thing about Ubuntu Linux today. Do subscribe to our newsletter to get our articles in your inbox regularly.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ItsFoss/~3/wrB_9zbKLUs/

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Nginx with libmodsecurity and OWASP ModSecurity Core Rule Set on Ubuntu 16.04



In this tutorial, I will show you how to compile the latest version of Nginx with libmodsecurity (Modsecurity 3.x) NOT to be confused with Modsecurity 2.9. We will also be integrating the OWASP ModSecurity Core Rule Set (CRS).



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/nginx-with-libmodsecurity-and-owasp-modsecurity-core-rule-set-on-ubuntu-1604/

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7 Simple Ways To Free Up Space On Ubuntu and Linux Mint


Brief: Running out of space on your Linux system? Here are several ways you can clean up your system to free up space on Ubuntu and other Ubuntu based Linux distributions.

Over time, any operating system can become cluttered as programs are added and removed. If you have like a TB of storage capacity, you might not bother to clean up Ubuntu to make some disk space. But if your hard disk has limited space, like I have a 128 GB SSD laptop, freeing up disk space becomes a necessity.

In this article, I’ll show you some of the easiest tricks to clean up your Ubuntu system and get more space.

How to free up disk space in Ubuntu and Linux Mint

How to free up space on Ubuntu and Linux Mint

There are several ways you clean up disk space in Ubuntu and other Ubuntu based system. I have discussed several command line tricks here followed by some GUI options.

While I have mentioned several ways here, if you are a beginner, avoid the ones marked as ‘expert’. Not that you cannot use them, but it’s better to avoid if you don’t know what you are doing.

I am using Ubuntu 16.04 while writing this tutorial but you can use the same steps for other Ubuntu versions, Linux Mint, elementary OS and other Ubuntu based Linux distributions.

1. Get rid of packages that are no longer required

If you read the apt-get commands guide, you might have come across the apt-get command option ‘autoremove’.

This option removes libs and packages that were installed automatically to satisfy the dependencies of an installed package. If that package is removed, these automatically installed packages are useless in the system. This command automatically removes such packages.It also removes old Linux kernel that

It also removes old Linux kernels that were installed from automatically in the system upgrade.

It’s a no-brainer command that you can run from time to time to make some free space on your Ubuntu system:

sudo apt-get autoremove

As you can see, this command is going to free up 300 Mb of free space in my system.

Free up space with autoremove command
Free up space with autoremove command

2. Clean up APT cache in Ubuntu

Ubuntu uses APT (Advanced Package Tool) for installing, removing and managing software on the system, and in doing so it keeps a cache of previously downloaded and installed packages even after they’ve been uninstalled.

The APT package management system keeps a cache of DEB packages in /var/cache/apt/archives. Over time, this cache can grow quite large and hold a lot of packages you don’t need.

You can see the size of this cache with the command below:

sudo du -sh /var/cache/apt

As you can see, I have over 500 Mb of cache storage. When you are almost out of space, this 500 Mb can make a lot of difference.

Clean up cache in Ubuntu Linux
Cleaning up cache will free up space

Now, you have two options to handle the cache.

Either remove only the outdated packages, like those superseded by a recent update, making them completely unnecessary.

sudo apt-get autoclean

Or clean out the cache in its entirety (frees more disk space):

sudo apt-get clean

3. Clean the thumbnail cache

Ubuntu automatically creates a thumbnail, for viewing in the file manager. It stores those thumbnails in a hidden directory in your user account at the location ~/.cache/thumbnails.

Over time, the number of thumbnails would increase dramatically. Moreover, the thumbnail cache will eventually contain many superfluous thumbnails of pictures that don’t exist anymore.

You can check the size of thumbnail cache with the command below:

du -sh ~/.cache/thumbnails

For my system, the thumbnail cache is over 300 Mb in size.

Clean thumbnail cache to free up space in Ubuntu
size of thumbnail cache can be a sore thumb

So it’s a good practice to clear the thumbnail cache every few months or so. The quickest way is to use the terminal:

rm -rf ~/.cache/thumbnails/*

4. Remove old Linux kernels that were manually installed [Expert]

The command discussed in the point 1 removes old Linux kernel. But it won’t work if you manually installed the kernel in Ubuntu. But removing old, unused Linux kernels will still save you plenty of space.

So, if you manually installed a Linux kernel, perhaps you can manually uninstall it as well.

List all installed Linux kernels first:

sudo dpkg --list 'linux-image*'

Removing the old kernels is the same as removing any other package. I’m using shell expansion for the version numbers to save typing. It will prompt you with a list of packages that will be removed, so you can double check the list before continuing.

Note: Replace VERSION with the version of the kernel you want to remove

sudo apt-get remove linux-image-VERSION

My recommendation is to keep at least two or preferably three kernels including the latest. This way, you will have at least one/two other kernels to boot with, if for whatever reason the latest kernel you are unable to boot with.

.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

Suggested Read
How To Easily Upgrade Linux Kernel In Ubuntu And Linux Mint

5. Remove orphaned packages [Expert]

First, let’s see what is an orphaned package in Ubuntu.

Suppose you installed a package ‘myprogram’. But this package has a dependency on the library ‘mylib’. This lib will be usually installed automatically with ‘myprogram’. When you delete ‘myprogram’, mylib might still remain in the system. Thus mylib, in this case, becomes an orphaned package.

Now, the command listed in point 1 removes such orphaned packages. But imagine the case where you had manually installed mylib before installing myprogram. The command ‘apt autoremove’ might not remove the orphaned package in this case. And hence you’ll have to manually delete it.

You’ll have to find all the orphaned packages first and then remove them. Thankfully, we have a GUI tool to do that: gtkorphan, a graphical frontend for deborphan.

Install gtkorphan via the terminal:

sudo apt-get install gtkorphan

And to remove orphaned packages, search for Removed Orphaned Package tool and run it to find all the orphaned packages in your system:

Remove orphaned packages in Ubuntu
Find and remove orphaned packages in Ubuntu

Honestly, I won’t go for this option unless you really need every Mb of free space.

6. Uninstalling unnecessary applications

We all have a few games and/or applications that we hardly use. Don’t trust me? Go and find installed software in Ubuntu system.

Chances are that you have a number of apps installed that you seldom use. Maybe you installed them on the back of an awesome review, out of nosiness, or to handle a particular task.

If you need space more getting rid of the unused or lesser used applications is always a good idea.

You can remove a program from the software centre or using the command below with particular app name:

sudo apt-get remove package-name1 package-name2

7. Using GUI tools to free space in Ubuntu

We saw a number of command line options to make space in Linux system but I understand if you don’t want to use the commands.

Remembering all the commands or using them all one by one may not be convenient for you. And this is why we have a number of GUI tools that will help you do that in a few clicks with an easy to use interface.

Stacer is one such tool that you could use. You can read this article to know how to use Stacer in Ubuntu.

Stacer - Dashboard
Stacer – Dashboard

You can check out more tools to clean up Ubuntu and make some free space easily.

Wrapping up

So, you saw a number of ways to clean up Ubuntu system. Personally, I use apt-get autoremove more often than any other commands here. Regularly using this command keeps the system free from unnecessary files.

I hope this article helped you to make free space in Ubuntu, Linux Mint and other such distributions. Do let me know if this worked for you or if you have some other tip to share.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ItsFoss/~3/__AiYoks10k/

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How to Install and Configure GitLab on Ubuntu 16.04



In this tutorial, I will show you step-by-step how to install GitLab CE (Community Edition) on your own Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus server. In this tutorial, I will be using the ‘omnibus’ package provided by GitLab for easy installation and create an SSL certificate with Let’s encrypt.



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-install-and-configure-gitlab-on-ubuntu-16-04/

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Why Oracle Java 7 And 6 Installers No Longer Work


Oracle Java
Because I’ve received more than 50 emails about this, I though I’d make a post about it, to clear things up for everybody.
While Oracle Java 6 and 7 are not supported for quite a while, they were still available for download on Oracle’s website until recently.

However, the binaries were removed about 10 days ago (?), so the Oracle Java (JDK) 6 and 7 installers available in the WebUpd8 Oracle Java PPA no longer work.

Oracle Java 6 and 7 are now only available for those with an Oracle Support account (which is not free), so I can’t support this for the PPA packages.

From the Oracle Java downloads page:

“Updates for Java SE 7 released after April 2015, and updates for Java SE 6 released after April 2013 are only available to Oracle Customers through My Oracle Support (requires support login).

Java SE Advanced offers users commercial features, access to critical bug fixes, security fixes, and general maintenance”.

It’s highly recommended you update to Oracle Java 8. Check out the following articles for how to install Oracle Java 8 in Ubuntu (or Linux Mint and derivatives) or Debian via PPA.
If you have an Oracle Support account and you really need Oracle JDK 6 or 7, you can get the installers from the WebUpd8 PPA to work by downloading the binaries and placing them in the following folder:
  • /var/cache/oracle-jdk6-installer/ for JDK 6 (you’ll need version 6u45)
  • /var/cache/oracle-jdk7-installer/ for JDK 7 (you’ll need version 7u80 for 32bit and 64bit or 7u60 for arm)

… and then install the oracle-java6-installer or oracle-java7-installer package.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/webupd8/~3/OK_UVwNHci8/why-oracle-java-7-and-6-installers-no.html

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How To Add An Image Watermark In GIMP In Linux


Brief: This quick tutorial shows you how to add a watermark on images using GIMP in Linux.

I create lots of images and meme for It’s FOSS Instagram account. And I always put the logo as a watermark on the images so that even if it is shared by other pages, the source of the image remains known to everyone.

Adding watermark to images in GIMP is fairly easy with a neat trick I use. I’ll share that ‘secret’ trick with you today so that even you can easily add watermark to images.

Do note that I am talking about using a logo image overlapping on another image. You might use text for the same purpose. It is up to you.

Easily add watermark using GIMP in Linux

How to add watermark using GIMP in Ubuntu Linux

I am using Ubuntu in this tutorial but the steps should be applicable to more or less all other Linux distributions. All you need is a logo image, preferably in png format. PNG images handle the transparent background very well and it is better to have a logo with a transparent background, isn’t it?

Once you have a logo, let’s see how to add this logo to any image using GIMP. Basically, we’ll add the logo as GIMP Brush and each time you need to add the watermark, just use the new custom brush.

Let’s see the steps.

Step 1:

Open your logo image in GIMP and export it (Shift+Ctrl+E) as gbr (GIMP Brush) file.

How to add a watermark using Gimp
Change file type to Gimp Brush

Step 2:

Once you have the logo as GIMP brush, copy it and go to your Home directory and change the view to show hidden files.

Look for a folder that starts with .gimp. Go to this folder and look for another folder named brushes. Paste the gbr file here.

Adding logo using GIMP
Save the GIMP Brush file in designated directory
.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

Suggested Read
Fix: GIMP Does Not Save In JPEG OR PNG Format

Step 3:

Restart GIMP. Now open any image for experimentation. Press Ctrl+B if you don’t see the toolbox. In here, look for any brush tool such as Paint Brush, Air Brush etc. Select the custom logo saved as a brush by clicking on this:

Adding image as watermark in GIMP
Use any brush tool

Increase the size of the brush, if needed:

Change the size of brush to add a watermark in GIMP
Change the size of brush if required

And now just click the brush where you want to put the logo:

Adding a watermark using GIMP in Linux
Click th Brush to add the logo wherever you want

Et voila! There you go. You have just added a logo to an image using GIMP. You can see the final result in this Facebook upload:

Do follow us on Facebook if you like some Linux fun 🙂

In future, whenever you need to add this watermark to any image, just select the custom brush, change its size and add it.

I hope you find this little trick to add watermark using GIMP. If you have a similar trick to share, do mention it in the comment section below.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ItsFoss/~3/-cfdDofz4pQ/

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Tilix (Previously Terminix) 1.5.8 And Guake 0.8.9 Available In PPA


Tilix (previously called Terminix) and Guake terminal emulators have had new releases recently, and are both available in PPA for Ubuntu / Linux Mint.

Tilix 1.5.8

Tilix

Tilix is a GTK3 terminal emulator. The application allows splitting terminals both horizontally and vertically, which can easily be re-arranged using drag and drop.
Other features include a Quake-like mode (the terminal appears at the top of the screen, and can be toggled on or off with a key), saving and loading groupped terminals, synchronized input and more.

Changes in Tilix 1.5.8 include:

  • window state is now saved and restored between sessions (e.g. if a window is maximized when closed, it will be maximized when you launch Tilix again);
  • sessions can be detached using drag and drop. They can also be re-attached to another Tilix window;
  • sessions can now be reordered using drag and drop or by using Ctrl + Pg Up / Ctrl + Pg Dn;
  • if Ctrl + C is assigned to copy shortcut, tilix is smart enough to only copy when text is selected otherwise normal interrupt is passed;
  • added new variable for titles at session scope for active terminal title;
  • added support for GTK active CSS style. This sould enable better styling of terminal titlebars;
  • added support for VTE hyperlink functionality;
  • bug fixes.

It’s also important to mention that with this release, Tilix now uses PCRE2 for regular expressions when the VTE version indicates it is supported. This feature was removed from VTE in Ubuntu 17.10, and as a result, Tilix won’t work properly in this Ubuntu version unless Tilix or VTE is patched.
I’ll look into this in the future. Right now, the WebUpd8 Tilix PPA doesn’t support Ubuntu 17.10.
To install Tilix in Ubuntu 16.04, 16.10 or 17.04 / Linux Mint 18.x, you can use the WebUpd8 Tilix PPA. To add the PPA and install Tilix, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/terminix
sudo apt update
sudo apt install tilix

I didn’t link directly to the Tilix deb because you’ll need some extra dependencies from the PPA.
For how to install Tilix in other Linux distributions, bug reports, etc., see its webpage.

Guake 0.8.9

Guake terminal

Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator. While a GTK3 version is in development (currently in alpha), the stable Guake version is currently using GTK2.
The application slides down from the top of the key when a key is pressed and slides back up when using the same key. This functionality is inspired from consoles using in games such as Quake.
Quake features multi-monitor support, tabs, transparency, and is higly configurable.

Changes in Guake 0.8.9 include:

  • a new option was added which allows running a script when the Guake window becomes visible (this is available on the “Hooks” tab);
  • added an option for toggling ‘resizer’ visibility;
  • tabs now share the full screen width;
  • the ‘Quick open’ feature now also matches /home path;
  • added “-l” command line option to get the tab label;
  • fixed quick open not working with dash;
  • Unity screen size fixes.

Guake 0.8.9 is available in the WebUpd8 Unstable / Backports PPA for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04, and 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x and 17.x.
I used this PPA so it’s easy to go back to the Guake version available in the official repositories in case you don’t like the new version or it’s buggy. The packages in this PPA are usually pretty stable, though some unstable packages may be added at times.
To add the PPA and install the latest Guake, use the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/unstable
sudo apt update
sudo apt install guake

If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can download the Guake deb from HERE (scroll down for the latest version).

To download the Guake source, report bugs, etc., see its GitHub page.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/webupd8/~3/JO-CWD2ZIl8/tilix-previously-terminix-158-and-guake.html

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Linux security alert: Bug in sudo’s get_process_ttyname() [ CVE-2017-1000367 ]



CVE-2017-1000367
There is a serious vulnerability in sudo command that grants root access to anyone with a shell account. It works on SELinux enabled systems such as CentOS/RHEL and others too. A local user with privileges to execute commands via sudo could use this flaw to escalate their privileges to root. Patch your system as soon as possible.



Source link: https://www.cyberciti.biz/security/linux-security-alert-bug-in-sudos-get_process_ttyname-cve-2017-1000367/