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MKVToolNix 14.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Support for Wave64 Files



MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced the release and immediate availability for download of MKVToolNix 14.0.0, a major release of the open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation app.

MKVToolNix 14.0.0 “Flow” is here just one month after the MKVToolNix 13.0.0 “The Juggler” release, and it looks like it adds a great number of new features and enhancements, along with numerous bug fixes and some build system changes. First off, the application is now officially translated into the Romanian language.

“Changes for package maintainers: a new translation of the programs to Romanian (ro.po) has been added. There are two other minor changes you should be aware of,” said Moritz Bunkus in the release announcement. “This is a reminder that certain features having been deprecated since v9.7.0.”

Additionally, some features will be removed from MKVToolNix in the first release of… (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/mkvtoolnix-14-0-0-open-source-mkv-manipulation-app-adds-support-for-wave64-files-517124.shtml

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GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Continues Its Migration to the Meson Build System



GNOME developer Javier Jardón announced the release and immediate availability of the fourth development milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

After a two-day delay, the GNOME 3.25.4 development snapshot is here, and it’s the last before GNOME 3.26 enters Beta, which will happen right after the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) 2017 event, which will take place in Manchester, United Kingdom, from Friday, July 28 until Wednesday, August 2.

In GNOME 3.25.4, the development team managed to port even more apps and components to the Meson build system, including the GNOME Shell user interface, which received a bunch of improvements. However, it looks like the Meson transition is not over yet, as some components don’t ship with Meson files.

“The fourth snapshot of GNOME 3.25 i… (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/gnome-3-26-desktop-environment-continues-its-migration-to-meson-build-system-517113.shtml

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Kalendar: A Minimal Calendar App for Linux


Brief: Kalendar is a minimal, lightweight calendar app for Linux built on C++ and Qt 5.

One of the primary reasons I use Linux on my desktops is because there exists a principle of simplicity in this domain. Even third-party Linux software respect this principle of simplicity. Transmission, one of the best torrent clients for Linux, does just what it’s supposed to do and nothing more. It’s famous counterparts for Windows platforms, well, they download more ads than the files they are supposed to. I never understood why you need to have a login feature for a torrent client.

I’m a huge fan of minimal software. They do just what they’re supposed to do. I’m happy and satisfied. I’ll pass on the bells and the whistles. Kalendar is one such simple application.

Kalendar: A minimal calendar app for Linux

Kalendar is written in C++ and uses Qt5 libraries for GUI. The project is inspired from Gnome-calendar but is written from scratch. The goal of the project is to provide a lightweight, functional calendar solution that does not require a lot of dependencies.

Kalendar

At the time of writing, Kalendar is still not mature according to its developer, but I found it works just fine.

Kalendar features a simple user interface. It is highly intuitive as far as event management and TODOs are concerned. A single click on the date pops up the ‘add event’ dialogue. The added events are displayed on the date with the category color code. The events can be made to recur annually or monthly by ticking the appropriate checkbox. So you never miss the opportunity to brighten up the birthdays of your loved ones.

Kalendar events

Kalendar allows you to create categories and color code them. This helps you to keep all your personal and work related events and TODOs organized in one application. You can create any number of categories you want. You can do this from Edit>>Edit categories. Duh!

Kalendar category

Kalendar allows you to import/export events from/to other calendar application using .ics files. Almost all major calendar apps support .ics files. You can also backup and restore your entire events database.

Installation

Since Kalendar is the new kid in town, it’s not yet available in the repositories of any distros (at the time of writing). But it has a very simple installation procedure and let’s see how to do it.

Download Kalendar

  1. Download the .zip file using the above button.
  2. Then go to the download location and extract the file (Right-click on the file>> Extract here).
  3. Open the ‘kalendar-master’ folder and move into ‘src’ folder.
  4. Right-click and open a terminal there and run the below commands one after the another.
qmake
make

That’s it. Run the Kalendar application by double clicking on ‘Kalendar’ binary. If prompted, click on ‘make executable and run’.

Finishing up

Do check out Kalendar. I’m sure you’ll like it, and if you’re into minimal stuff, well, you’ll love it. Do give it a try and share your thoughts on it in the comments below. Don’t forget to share this article. Peace.





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KDE Plasma 5.10.4 Desktop Environment Released with Support for Shaded Windows



KDE today announced the release and general availability of the fourth bugfix update for the latest stable KDE Plasma 5.10 series of the desktop environment designed for GNU/Linux distributions.

KDE Plasma 5.10.4 is here three weeks after last month’s 5.10.3 release, and it looks like it adds another layer of improvements by fixing annoying bugs across multiple components. According to the changelog, it would appear that a total of 36 issues were resolved across the KWin composite and window manager, Plasma Discover package manager, and Bluedevil Bluetooth daemon.

The Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, Plasma Addons, System Settings, SDDM KCM, and xdg-desktop-portal-kde components have been improved as well, and among some of the items that caught our eye, we can mention support for shaded windows in KWin, along with better support for Mesa 17.x graphics stack, as well as better support for PackageKit and Flatpak in Plasma Discover.

“Today KDE releases a Bugfix upd… (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/kde-plasma-5-10-4-desktop-environment-released-with-support-for-shaded-windows-517039.shtml

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The Witcher 3 and GTA 5 Are Now Better Supported on Linux with Wine Staging 2.11



The Wine Staging development team announced the availability of a new version of their optimized Wine builds, based, of course, on the latest Wine development release.

Coming a week after the release of Wine 2.11, Wine Staging 2.11 is here to inherit all of its improvements and new features, including OpenGL support for the Android driver, support for security labels, better dictionary support in WebServices, relay debugging support on ARM64 (AArch64), and a new registry file parser for RegEdit.

On top of that, the Wine Staging 2.11 release adds a bunch of improvements of its own, such as optimizations to keyboard and mouse handling, the ability to run PIE (Position-Independent Executable) binaries, better compatibility with older macOS versions for the preloader, as well as some NVAPI enhancements.

The … (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/the-witcher-3-and-gta-5-are-now-better-supported-on-linux-with-wine-staging-2-11-516763.shtml

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Ubuntu MATE's Software Boutique Package Manager Is Getting Support for Snaps



Ubuntu MATE developer Martin Wimpress announced that, in collaboration with Luke Horwell, he plans to revamp the Software Boutique default graphical package manager of the Ubuntu MATE operating system.

It’s been a while since Ubuntu MATE’s Software Boutique received any major changes, but it finally looks like it will get some much-needed attention as developer Luke Horwell gave users a sneak peek to the upcoming Software Boutique version that’ll be shipping with Ubuntu MATE 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) later this year.

And the biggest seems to be the implementation of support for Canonical’s Snappy technologies, replacing the old and unmaintained aptdaemon backend, which is currently used in Ubuntu MATE’s Software Boutique to let users install packages from the default repositories, with snapd-glib to allow installation of Snaps, a universal binary format for GNU/Linux distros.

“Why the c… (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/ubuntu-mate-s-software-boutique-package-manager-is-getting-support-for-snaps-516723.shtml

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CrossOver for Android Lets You Run Windows Apps on Intel-Based Chromebooks



CodeWeavers‏, the commercial company behind the well-known CrossOver for Linux and Mac application that lets users install and run Windows apps and games is still working to release an Android version.

Dubbed CrossOver Android, the project has been in development for the past year, and while it’s still in an Alpha state, it looks like it is already capable of running Windows software on Intel-based Chromebooks and Android tablets. Since then, the project kept updating CrossOver for Android with new features.

The latest Alpha version of CrossOver Android was released a few days ago, and it looks like it brings support for Google’s Android Nougat mobile operating system, better support for running Microsoft Office on Chromebooks, support for 64-bit file offsets to allow the use of very large files, and some visual enhancements to the UI.

“CrossOver’s UI has further enhancements, and we have improved our feature for gathering debug logs during testing. We have many o… (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/crossover-for-android-lets-you-run-windows-apps-on-intel-based-chromebooks-516698.shtml

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Ebook Management Software Calibre 3.0 Released


Calibre 3.0 is available now

The Calibre team has released the latest version of its cross-platform ebook management software. Calibre 3.0 comes about three years after Calibre 2.0. The open source ebook manager lets you download, view and convert ebooks, news and magazines from the web.

You can even create eBooks in Linux with it. Calibre is unarguably the best open source ebook management software out there.

Calibre 3.0 comes along with many new features and improvements that will be of benefit to all its users.

Major changes that have featured include the support for high-resolution displays and completely re-written Content Server that allows users to wirelessly browse and read Calibre ebooks on modern phones and tablets. The books could be stored off-line on the phone’s storage and used with or without Internet connection.

New Features & Improvements in Calibre 3.0

Content Server: This feature has seen a total rewrite of the existing feature. The Calibre Content Server lets you have your ebook available within a local area network. This means you can connect to it using a browser on your desktop PC, notebook, phone or tablet by typing http://localhost:8080 in the address bar. This gives you access to ebooks that have been stored on the server from other devices.

Calibre 3.0

It should be noted that the content server is not run by default. To run it, you need to click on the Connect/Share icon and select the Start Content Server option on the context menu. Calibre 3.0 no longer supports the server or database executable files like calibredb.exe, calibre.exe or calibre-server.exe. These files now have the capability of modifying data.

Supports High Resolution Screens: According to the release, this was “a much requested feature”. Calibre 3.0 now supports high resolution (Retina) screens. It can auto-detect the screen resolution and adjusts itself accordingly when it is started up. The screen resolution can also be managed through Preferences where the user goes to Look & feel then Adjust for high resolution screens.

.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

Suggested Read
Get More Out Of Your Kindle In Linux With These Tips

New Default Icon Set and Icon Themes: Calibre 3.0 now supports the possibility of installing different icon themes which users can choose to suit their tastes. To celebrate their tenth birthday, that was in October 2016, calibre changed its default icons. Anyhow, the old icons are still available as an icon theme for users who want to use it. This option can be found under Preferences > Look & Feel > Icon theme.

Calibre 3.0 released

Microsoft Word (DOCX) Conversion: Another new feature is that you can now convert book formats to Microsoft Word (DOCX) files. It is also possible for users to go back and forth from Word documents to ebook formats.

Calibre 3.0 Bug Fixes:

Some major bug fixes include:

  • Kobo driver: Fix for detection of some devices, with SD card not working on macOS
  • CHM Input: Handle CHM files that have missing or empty root files.
  • Tag browser: Fix preservation of state when recounting and the visible categories have changed.

Check out all the bug fixes.

Calibre 3.0 Downloads

You can download Calibre 3.0 from the official website:

Download Calibre 3.0

Have you already tried the latest release of Calibre 3.0? Share your experience with us in the comment section below.





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6 Open Source Tools to Create Interactive Fiction


Every year video games graphics become more and more realistic. Unfortunately, this often means that the story takes a back seat to the impressive graphics. On the flip side is interactive fiction, which puts story before anything else. While it was popular back in the early days of computing, interactive fiction has seen a resurgence of popularity in recent years.

Here are five open source tools that you can use to create your own interactive fiction. But before that let me answer what is interactive fiction.

What is Interactive Fiction?

Open Source tools to create interactive fiction

Interactive Fiction (or IF) is a category of computer games that allow players to control the game’s main character through a series of text commands. One of the of the most well-known text adventure games is Zork.

There is a more graphically rich version of IF called gamebooks. Gamebooks allow you to click your way through the game, as well. Even so, graphics and images do not make up much of the game. The focus is on text and story. A good example of gamebooks is the Choose Your Own Adventure series.

You can find IF games to play here and here.

Best open source tools to create Interactive Fiction

Earlier I showed you how to create eBooks in Linux. Today, I’ll show you some tools that you can use to create Interactive Fiction on Linux. The following programs are not listed in any particular order.

1. Twine

Twine is an easy to use program that allows you to create an IF game without knowing how to code. All you have to do is create a series of passages and connecting them. Twine gives you the option to see a map of how all your passages are connected and how they flow from one to another.

If you want to add more to your game, you can extend it “with variables, conditional logic, images, CSS, and JavaScript”. Twine exports your finished product as an HTML file. This makes it very easy to share with others.

Currently, the latest version of Twine is 2.1.3, which is available for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS. It is licensed under GPL v3.

.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

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7 Best Linux Tools For Digital Artists

2. Quest

Quest is another option that allows you to create IF without knowing how to program. This application comes with a visual script editor that allow you to pick commands from a list, so you don’t have to memorize commands. Quest allows the creation of both text adventures and gamebooks.

Just like Twine, Quest can be extended using pictures, music, and sound effect. You can even embed videos from Youtube and Vimeo. You can even modify the interface of your final game using HTML and Javascript.

The latest downloadable version is 5.7.0 for Windows. If you have Linux or Mac, you can use the online editor. It is licensed under MIT. You can check out the source code here.

3. Squiffy

Squiffy is another IF creation tool from the makers of Quest. It is marketed as “A simple way to write interactive fiction”. Squiffy is a little different than the previous application because it can output HTML and Javascript, like Twine, which can be played on your own website. You can also use PhoneGap to turn the game into an app.

The most recent release of Squiffy is 5.0. It can be run on Linux, Mac, and Windows. You can also use it in the browser. It is licensed under MIT. You can check out the source code here.

4. TADS

TADS or Text Adventure Development System is a “prototype-based domain-specific programming language and a set of standard libraries for” to create IF. The most recent version of the TADS language is based on C++ and Javascript. It comes with a compiler to let you play games, as well as, create them.

TADS is by far one of the more complicated entries on the list. I’m not sure what license it uses, but according to their website any IF game created with it can be distributed or sold without restriction.

.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

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5. Inform

Just like the previous entry, Inform is more than a simple program to create IF. Inform is an entire “design system for interactive fiction based on natural language.” The wide range of tools included allow you to create “adventure games, historical simulations, gripping stories or experimental digital art.” The finished source code “reads like English sentences, making it uniquely accessible to non-programmers”.

Inform has a library of user-created extensions to add features to your IF story. The creators or Inform also wrote an ebook entitled Writing with Inform to help writers get started. Inform can run on Linux, Mac, and Windows. The Linux version uses the GNOME framework. The most recent release of Inform is 7.0.

6. Ren’Py

Ren’Py is a graphic novel creator. I almost didn’t include it in this article, but it looked too neat not to ignore. According to the site, Ren’Py is “free and cross-platform engine for digital storytelling. It makes it easy to combine words, images, and sounds to create visual novels and life simulation games.”

Like several of the entries on this list, Ren’Py comes with its own language but also supports the Python scripting language. Ren’Py offers support for Linux, Windows, and Mac. Games created with it can also be played on iOS or Android. You can even create a version to upload to Steam. Most of Ren’Py is licensed as MIT. You can take a look at the source code here. The most recent release of Ren’Py is 6.99.12.

Final Thoughts

Interactive Fiction was one of the first ways that early programmers created and played games. Today, they are still quite relevant because they can be played anywhere and the tools keep improving.

When I was younger, I used to read a lot of Choose Your Own Adventure books, so I can see the attraction to these games. As a fiction author, I have played around with the idea of creating my own but was always too busy. I plan to take another crack at it soon. The nice thing is that there are so many tools and options to choose from.

Have you ever played or created Interactive Fiction? What is your favorite IF? What IF tools did I miss? Please let me know in the comments below.

If you found this article interesting, please take a minute to share it on social media.





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Linux 4.14 to Be the Next LTS Kernel Series, Supported for at Least 2 Years



Renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced earlier this morning on his Google+ page that the upcoming Linux 4.14 kernel series will be an LTS (Long Term Support) branch.

Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series did not even start, as the version that’s being developed these days is Linux 4.12, which should be promoted to stable early next month. Two weeks after the release of Linux kernel 4.12, development of the Linux 4.13 kernel branch will begin.

As the first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of Linux kernel 4.13 could hit the streets in mid-July or a week later on the 23rd, we’re looking at a final release of the series in early September, so only two weeks after that, the development of the Linux 4.14 kernel will commence, around mid-September.

Linux kernel 4.14 to be supported… (read more)



Source link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/linux-4-14-to-be-the-next-lts-kernel-series-supported-for-at-least-2-years-516520.shtml