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Linux clear command tutorial for beginners (3 examples)



Sometimes, while working on the command line, you arrive at a point where there’s too much text on the terminal screen, and none of that is relevant to you. So, in order to avoid distraction, you’d want to clear the terminal screen. Those new to the Linux command line may not know that there exists a dedicated command line utility that does this work for you.



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/linux-clear-command/

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Write! An Elegant Distraction-Free Writing App Is Now Available For Linux


Write! A distraction free writing tool with a beautiful interface is now available for Linux.

Write! has a number of features that many writers would love. Some of the main features of Write! include auto-saving, cloud-synced documents, offline editing, dark and light themes, unlimited undo, productivity stats. You can also publish your notes to the web directly from the app.

I must mention here that Write! is neither free (in terms of money as well) nor open source. But since it provides an application for Linux desktop, I am covering it.

Write! features

Write! writing app for Linux

Some of the main highlights of Write! are:

  • Auto-saving (even unnamed documents) with unlimited cloud storage
  • Offline autosaving
  • Multiple tabs and writing sessions
  • Document library
  • Spell checker
  • Smart auto-complete based on your typing history
  • Markdown and wiki support
  • Unlimited number of undo, even across multiple devices (can undo on Linux what you wrote on Windows)
  • Productivity stats tell you how many words you typed. You can set goals here.
  • Share the notes either on social media or publish it on the web (like Simplenote)
  • Dark and light UI and editor themes
  • Multiple text style presets
  • Focus mode for distraction free writing
  • Cross platform but no mobile applications

You can watch this video to see some of these features in action:

.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

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Boostnote: Open Source Note Taking App For Programmers

Experience with Write!

So I set out exploring Write! app on Ubuntu 16.04. There is an executable made available by Write! team which can be run on any Linux distributions.

Though I don’t have the technical details, I have a feeling that the Linux app is built on Electron.

You must have an account to use Write! app. Your notes are saved to a private cloud provided by Write! linked to your account.

Write! app for Linux
Account is mandatory

The GUI is impressive for sure. Notes are saved automatically with a sync sign reminding you of the saving process.

Write! app for Linux
Notes sync automatically to a private cloud

The dark theme looks cooler than the white one.

Write! app for Linux
Dark theme looks fabulous

Using Write! with the dark theme and auto-completion and spelling suggestions actually made me feel like I was using Atom and that’s not a bad thing.

Rest of the writing experience is similar to what any modern writing app would provide. It is the additional features that count.

Verdict

Write! is a superb app for professional writing with all the right weapons in its armory. If you are a serious writer and can spend $20 (for the lifetime license), Write! could be your choice.

Write!





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ItsFoss/~3/gOT7VepEK4w/

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Tool To Create Bootable Windows USB Stick From Linux `WinUSB` (Fork) Renamed To `WoeUSB`, Sees New Release


The WinUSB fork we covered a while back was renamed to WoeUSB recently, while also seeing quite a few releases for the past few days.

WoeUSB

WoeUSB / WinUSB is a tool that can be used to create a bootable Windows installer USB stick from an ISO or DVD. The application supports Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, as well Windows 10, and can be used either with a GUI or from the command line.

As for supported bootmodes, WoeUSB / WinUSB can create a bootable Windows USB installation stick using the following:
  • Legacy / MBR-style / IBM PC compatible bootmode;
  • Native UEFI booting is supported for Windows 7 and later images (with a limitation: only FAT filesystem can be used as the target filesystem).

Since it was forked from Colin Gille’s WinUSB, the application has seen a major code refactoring, bug fixes as well as some minor new features. The changes include:
  • support for both wxWidgets 2 and 3;
  • use pkexec instead of gksudo for privilege escalation;
  • UEFI boot support;
  • numerous bug fixes.

Some newer WoeUSB changes include:

  • support customizing the –label of the newly created filesystem in –format mode;
  • implement checking on target filesystem in –install mode;
  • command line: check if target media is busy before continuing and bail out when the target partition is mounted;
  • support Linux distributions that uses “grub2” as prefix name, such as Fedora;
  • –install and –format installation options are deprecated in favor of –partition and –device, to be more clear what both options will do. The old options will still be available until WoeUSB v3.0;
  • from now on, GRUB will pause when the ENTER key is used before starting to load Windows. This is useful if you want to see if there are errors in the GRUB loading stage.

Also, since the application name has changed, the executables have changed as well: “woeusbgui” for the GUI and “woeusb” for the command line tool.

You can see what’s new in each new WoeUSB release (there were 13 new releases for the past 2 days) on GitHub.

Despite the major code refactoring and numerous bug fixes, I still encountered an error using the WoeUSB GUI, which I also found in the original WinUSB. When the Windows USB stick is completed, WoeUSB displayed the following message: “Installation failed ! Exit code: 256”. This bug was closed on GitHub and it looks like it doesn’t affect the actual Windows USB stick in any way.

In my test, I was able to install Windows 10 64bit in VirtualBox (on an Ubuntu 17.04 host) despite this error.

Install WoeUSB in Ubuntu or Linux Mint via PPA

WoeUSB is available in the main WebUpd8 PPA, for Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x. To add the PPA and install WoeUSB, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

If you don’t want to add the PPA, you can grab the latest WoeUSB deb from HERE (you’ll only need the “woeusb” deb; the “winusb” deb is there as a transitional dummy package, so those that had the old fork installed will receive the new WoeUSB package as an update).

For how to build WoeUSB from source, report bugs, etc., see its GitHub page.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/webupd8/~3/bvQ4oj8tKkw/tool-to-create-bootable-windows-usb.html

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Linux Chgrp Command for Beginners (5 Examples)



Here at HowtoForge, we recently discussed the chown command which lets users change the owner as well as group of file (or a directory) in Linux. But did you know there exists a dedicated command line utility that you can use when it comes to changing group-related information? The tool in question is chgrp, and in this tutorial, we will be discussing this tool using easy to understand examples.



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/linux-chgrp-command/

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How to configure MySQL Multi-Master Replication on Oracle Linux



This tutorial explains how to setup and configure MySQL multi-master replication on Oracle Linux. Please note that even though the configuration is made under Oracle Linux, yet the steps and configuration are mainly the same to CentOS and Red Hat Linux.



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-configure-mysql-multi-master-replication-on-oracle-linux/

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Best Comic Book Readers for Linux


Brief: If you are fond of reading comic books on your desktop, you can use these comic book viewers for Linux.

I used to be a huge fan of comic books. You might have grown reading Batman, Superman, X-Men etc, but I spent my childhood and teenage on regular doses of Dhruva, Nagraj and Doga (Indian superheroes). While I no longer read comic books, I do stumble upon some old comics here and there.

These comics are usually created in specific file formats and sometimes cannot be viewed in the default document viewer. This is where we need a dedicated application to read comics on Linux.

In this article, I’ll list some of the options available for reading comic books on Linux.

Best comic book viewers for Linux

Best comic book readers for Linux

Before we see the comics viewers for Linux, I would like to mention that I am deliberately not including Comix and Calibre in this list.

Comix is available in almost all the major Linux distribution repository, however, this application has not been updated for last 8 years.

Calibre is an excellent tool and you can even create eBook in Linux with it. But then it is a resource heavy program and I won’t recommend using Calibre just for reading a comic book.

I would also like to add that some document readers such as Okular, Evince (Document Viewer in Ubuntu) etc are capable of opening a regular comic book. But dedicated comic book readers provide additional functionalities that add to the joy of reading comics on Linux.

Let’s see what applications you can use in Linux to view comic books.

1. MComix

MComix comic book viewer for Linux

MComix is a user-friendly and customizable image viewer. Though it is specifically designed to handle comic books (both Western comics and Manga) and supports a variety of file formats such as CBR, CBZ, CB7, CBT, LHA and PDF.

MComix is actually a fork of the Comix project with the aim to provide bug fixes and stability improvements on top of Comix. Some of the main features are:

  • Along with most common image formats used for comic books it also reads PDF, ZIP, RAR, 7Z and LHA archives directly.
  • Multiple viewing modes: full-screen mode, double-page mode, fit image to window width, height or both.
  • Smart scrolling for easier reading (just hit the space bar a few times and see how it works)
  • Manga mode for right-to-left comic books
  • Bookmark pages and add books to the library

In Ubuntu, Linux Mint and other Ubuntu-based Linux distributions, you can use the command below to install it:

sudo apt install mcomix

You can get more information on its homepage:

MComix

.IRPP_button , .IRPP_button .postImageUrl , .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { min-height: 86px; position: relative; } .IRPP_button , .IRPP_button:hover , .IRPP_button:visited , .IRPP_button:active { border:0!important; } .IRPP_button { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #141414; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); } .IRPP_button:active , .IRPP_button:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_button .postImageUrl { background-position: center; background-size: cover; float: right; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 30%; } .IRPP_button .centered-text-area { float: left; width: 70%; padding:0; margin:0; } .IRPP_button .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 13px; font-weight: bold; letter-spacing: .125em; margin: 0; padding: 0; } .IRPP_button .postTitle { color: #ECF0F1; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button .ctaButton { background: #1ABC9C; color: #FFFFFF; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; margin: 18px 14px 18px 14px; moz-border-radius: 3px; padding: 12px 0; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; webkit-border-radius: 3px; width: 80px; position: absolute; } .IRPP_button:hover .ctaButton { background: #16A085; } .IRPP_button .centered-text { display: table; height: 86px; padding:0; margin:0; padding-left: 108px!important; top: 0; } .IRPP_button .IRPP_button-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 10px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .IRPP_button:after { content: “”; display: block; clear: both; }

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Best Linux Magazines You Can Subscribe To

2. Peruse

Peruse comic book reader for Linux

Peruse is a comic book reader from KDE. It was created to make reading comics on the desktop as easy and pleasant as possible.

Peruse tries to provide a modern user interface and succeed to an extent. Apart from the UI, some of the other main features of Peruse are:

  • Supports a wide variety of file formats: cbz, cbr, cb7, cbt, cba, pdf, epub, dvi, djvu and chm
  • Provides a library that can be sorted by author, series or recentness
  • Welcome screen gives quick access to recently used files
  • Sidebar view for quick access
  • Available for both Linux and Windows

You can get the download information on its website:

Peruse

3. YACReader

YACReader comic book reader for Linux

YACReader is a cross-platform open source application for reading digital comic books. It is available for Linux, Windows, macOS and iOS. Some of its main features are:

  • Supports a wide variety of comic files and image types. rar, zip, cbr, cbz, tar, pdf, 7z and cb7, jpeg, gif, png, tiff and bmp.
  • Plenty of configuration options: image rotation, double page mode, full-size view, fullscreen mode, customizable background color, custom page fitting mode, bookmarks, resume reading etc
  • Image adjustments available in the reading mode. You can use the brightness, contrast and gamma sliders to enjoy the new vibrant colors.
  • Library to organize comics
  • Keeps track of your reading progress
  • Download comics’ information such as title, number, volume, authors etc from Comic Vine.
  • Built in search engine to find comics

You can get the download information on YACReader homepage.

YACReader

Bonus: Websites to legally download old comic books

Apart from listing the best comic book readers for Linux, I would also like to mention a few websites from where you can download vintage comic books. And it is completely legal to download them.

While these might not be popular ones like Batman and Spiderman but perhaps you might have come across some of them in your childhood. Even if not, it is fun to read the literature and watch movies of the bygone era. Being a fan of black and white film-noir fan, I certainly enjoy them.

The Digital Comic Museum

Comic Book Plus

If you have some other preferred tool for reading comics or some other website to download comics legally, don’t forget to share it with rest of us. Enjoy reading comics on Linux.





Source link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ItsFoss/~3/OzV6Udxmj_Q/

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Linux Chown Command Tutorial for Beginners (7 Examples)



In Linux, there may be times when you might want to change the owner and group-related information for a file or directory. If you are a command line newbie, and want to know how you can make such changes through the command line, you’ll be glad to know that there exists a command – dubbed chown – that lets you do this.



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/linux-chown-command/

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Linux Join Command Tutorial for Beginners (5 examples)



Sometimes, you may want to combine two files in a way that the output makes even more sense. For example, there could be a file containing name of continents, and another file containing names of countries located in these continents, and the requirement is to combine both files in a way that a continent and the corresponding country appear in the same line.



Source link: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/linux-join-command/